Asian News


Breaking: Bomb found at Fukushima nuclear plant

10th Aug 2017

Mainichi, Aug 10, 2017 (emphasis added): Suspected bomb found on premises of Fukushima power plant: TEPCO — What appears to be an undetonated bomb has been discovered on the premises of the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) announced on Aug. 10. The device was discovered buried in the ground at a parking lot currently undergoing maintenance in the western corner of the premises… Police have cordoned off the surrounding area…

 

 

source:http://enenews.com/breaking-bomb-found-at-fukushima-nuclear-plant-military-unit-is-headed-to-the-site-police-have-cordoned-off-the-surrounding-area

Workplace Surveillance Is The New Office ‘Perk’

big brother facebook

8th April 2016

James Jordan rolled out of bed just before 5 a.m. on a recent Saturday and went straight to work. A job was available as soon as he logged into the Mechanical Turk website from his computer at home, a small duplex he shares with his grandmother in Bakersfield, California.

Images of t-shirts and polo shirts flashed on Jordan’s monitor, and he was asked to rate their similarity. He would earn a penny each time he completed the tiny task. The rest of the morning was a blur as Jordan raced to get more than 3,000 of them done. He skipped taking a shower and stopped only for the occasional cigarette outside — each puff a reminder that he didn’t earn money during breaks. Between batches of photos, Jordan also managed to pick up a handful of short academic surveys offered through the site, which farms out an array of digital piecework day and night to workers around the world.

For each completed survey Jordan earned 50 cents a pop.

“There are days when you can’t look away from the screen,” said Jordan, 26, who has earned a living for the last year-and-a-half tagging photos, participating in studies, or tackling whatever day labor Mechanical Turk has to offer. “Days like that make you really question why you’re doing what you’re doing.” 

By the time he wrapped up that afternoon he had made just over $60. His earnings as a virtual laborer that month, including some 12-hour days, would come in at $1,174.24. “I’ve been poor my whole life,” said Jordan. “So $1,200 is pretty good.”

Jordan is among thousands of low-paid workers toiling behind isolated screens to make the internet and an array of ephemeral factories hum.

The rapid growth of Silicon Valley companies such as Uber, TaskRabbit, and Airbnb have cast a spotlight on parts of the burgeoning gig economy. But ventures like Mechanical Turk — and the men and women who power them from bedrooms, couches, and coffee shops — remain less known and largely invisible. Tackling millions of digital micro tasks daily, these crowd labor platforms comprise a web of virtual assembly lines that can be as precarious and low-paying as their predecessors from the industrial era. Moreover, they can offer a startling glimpse into the bleak future of low-wage, low-skilled work.

“Dystopian would be one accurate way of describing it,” Moshe Marvit, a labor lawyer and scholar who has written extensively about crowd labor, told Vocativ. “The worst possible world for workers might be another.

Proponents of crowd labor offer a markedly different vision for this digital workforce, one that’s as disruptive as it is democratic. “The crowdsourcing industry [is] bringing opportunities to people who never would have had them before, and we operate in a truly egalitarian fashion, where anyone who wants to can do microtasks, no matter their gender, nationality, or socio-economic status, and can do so in a way that is entirely of their choosing and unique to them,” Lukas Biewald, the CEO of CrowdFlower, a San Francisco-based platform, told the Nation in 2014.

Sites like Crowdflower, Mechanical Turk, Clickworker, UpWork, and its dozens of competitors comprise a large — and growing — market for small, digital tasks outsourced around the globe. The World Bank estimates that the online outsourcing industry generated close to $2 billion in revenue in 2013, a figure that could increase to $25 billion by the end of the decade. Crowdwork companies boast about workforces that number in the hundreds of thousands.

Among platforms used to facilitate this market, Mechanical Turk is one of the largest in the U.S. Launched by Amazon in 2005, it now claims to have more than half a million “crowdworkers” powering its digital machine, though an exact number of active users is not available. Their jobs are ones that even the most sophisticated computers, algorithms, or other forms of artificial intelligence can’t perform, but which constitute the very nuts and bolts of the internet that most take for granted. Amorphous shop floors of crowdworkers churn out online product reviews and spam. They tag photos and websites, verify URLs, and fine tune search engine optimization. Some have also probably written the titles to your favorite porn videos online.

Companies or clients, known on Mechanical Turk as “requesters,” farm out these gigs, which are sometimes broken down into hundreds of thousands of microtasks. Workers, who refer to themselves as “Turkers,” accept these jobs — eerily referred to as HITs, or Human Intelligence Tasks — that pay anywhere from a penny to several dollars each. For its role, Amazon takes a commission of anywhere between 20 percent and 40 percent.

The sweeping range of microtasks made available on Mechanical Turk is matched by a labor force that’s equally motley. On any given day, the site can draw a mishmash of recent college grads and ex-cons, retirees and former school teachers, said Kristy Milland, a moderator for Turker Nation, one of the many online forums that exist for these workers. There are stay-at-home moms looking to pick up a little extra cash and full-time Turkers hustling to pay their bills. For the disabled and the socially anxious, it can be a lifeline.

“Compared to any other work place it’s insane,” Milland said of the diversity among workers on Mechanical Turk. 

But Turking ain’t always easy.

Like most who earn a paycheck in the gig economy, Turkers are categorized as independent contractors, neither employees of Mechanical Turk nor the requesters using the site. That means they are not legally entitled to a minimum wage, overtime pay, or a host of other protections that cover employees. The HITs can be mind-numbingly monotonous and their availability erratic, leaving some reluctant to ever stray too far from their computers. Requesters have also been known to refuse to pay for work completed —an experience common among Turkers, though one for which they have no recourse.

What’s also drawn ongoing scrutiny is the pay. Two recent independent surveys found that around half of Turkers in the U.S. earned fewer than $5 an hour, far less than the $7.25 an hour federal minimum wage. Only eight percent of participants from a Pew study published last year said they made more than $8 an hour. Yet almost a quarter of them said they relied on Mechanical Turk for most or all of their income.  

“Amazon’s Mechanical Turk has become a kind of last ditch for many,” said Milland, who spent nearly a decade working full-time on the site and is now an advocate for crowd workers. “It’s creating a kind of digital underclass.”

To be clear, not all Turkers find themselves toiling as virtual day laborers for low wages. Some, in fact, have carved out a comfortable living and lifestyle around the platform. Dane, who spoke with Vocativ on the condition we not publish his last name, began Turking in 2013 after he was diagnosed with brain cancer. He now says he makes more than $30,000 a year from the site and has time to run a photography business on the side. “This life feels more fulfilling for me,” said Dane, a former field service engineer. “It’s worth an awful lot.”

For Jordan, Turking might not guarantee a minimum wage for the work he puts in. But it also means no long commutes, burning money on gas, or running late. He also has a flexible schedule and no bosses telling him what he can and can’t do. “That’s a pretty nice feeling,” he said.

Such perks or perceived conveniences should not have to come at the cost of substandard pay or basic rights as a worker, said Miriam Cherry, a professor at the Saint Louis School of Law whose research focuses on labor and employment in the virtual world. “There’s plenty of computer workers in an office who get paid minimum wage. Why would that be any different if you work at home?” said Cherry, who last year co-edited the book, “Invisible Labor: Hidden Work in the Contemporary World.”

More Turkers are beginning to recognize a need to work together in order to exert more say over their jobs. They’ve devised rating systems for vetting requesters and created various online forums where they can trade tips, alert each other to lucrative gigs, and talk about life outside of Turking. Hundreds even organized a letter writing campaign to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos with the message that they were human beings, not algorithms.

These worker-driven efforts have yielded some success. Scamming requesters are now easier to identify. The letter-writing campaign earned international headlines, providing a brief window of visibility for a largely anonymous workforce. But without legal protections for workers, observers like Cherry believe many will remain vulnerable to ever-greater exploitation. “If we don’t do something about it at some point that’s what we’re going to get,” she said. “It’s a race to the bottom.”

Meanwhile, the low cost and convenience of crowd labor continues to attract interest among a growing number of fields. Researchers at universities and non-profits have increasingly turned to Mechanical Turk to farm subjects for their studies — a decision that’s yielded mixed results. In the last few years, Turkers have even been used at times to diagnose a host of medical cases and work as amateur pathologists to analyze potential cancer cells. For some, such developments don’t bode well for the future of work. 

“There’s never been as deregulated a labor market as the one that exists online,” said Marvit, the labor scholar. “More professional work is going to be eaten up by it.” 

 

 

source: http://www.vocativ.com/410794/are-virtual-sweatshops-the-future-of-work/

Russia Extends Edward Snowden’s Asylum

pepe

18th Jan 2017

A day after President Obama commuted the sentence of Chelsea Manning, the Russian government clarified on Wednesday the fate of Edward J. Snowden, the other main source of secrets about United States surveillance in recent years.

Mr. Snowden, a former National Security Agency contractor who was granted asylum in Russia in 2013, will be allowed to remain in the country for “a couple more years,” Maria Zakharova, a spokeswoman for the Foreign Ministry, said on Facebook.

Mr. Snowden and his supporters have been campaigning for a pardon from President Obama, but the chances of clemency appear to be vanishingly small given that his name did not appear on a list of pardons on Tuesday.

Ms. Zakharova described her Facebook post as a rejection of an idea presented in a recent article in The Cipher Brief by a former acting director of the Central Intelligence Agency, Michael J. Morell. He suggested that Russia should extradite Mr. Snowden to the United States as a signal of good will to the incoming Trump administration.

Ms. Zakharova said that Mr. Morell’s suggestion of turning over Mr. Snowden would amount to “a gift” for the new American leader. That is apparently a gesture that Russia is not prepared to make, however, even though President-elect Donald J. Trump has spoken admiringly of Russia and its president, Vladimir V. Putin.

“The funniest thing is that the former deputy director of the C.I.A. !!! does not know that Snowden’s residence permit in Russia was just extended for a couple more years,” Ms. Zakharova wrote.

“And seriously, the essence of what the C.I.A. agent is suggesting is an ideology of betrayal,” she wrote. “You spoke, Mr. Morrell, and now it’s clear to everybody that in your office, it’s normal to bring gifts in the form of people, and to hand over those who seek defense.”

In an interview with The Guardian in September, Mr. Snowden argued that his revelations about government surveillance were not only morally right but that they also led to an overhaul of secrecy laws that benefited Americans.

“I think when people look at the calculations of benefit, it is clear that in the wake of 2013, the laws of our nation changed,” Mr. Snowden said. “Congress, the courts and the president all changed their policies as a result of these disclosures.”

Mr. Snowden is accused of violating the Espionage Act in the United States and would face at least 30 years in prison if convicted.

Some privacy advocates have lionized Mr. Snowden as a whistle-blower, while his opponents and government officials have cast him as a defector, particularly in light of his flight to Russia.

Mr. Snowden has taken pains to portray his exile as comfortable. He spends time with his girlfriend, Lindsay Mills, according to posts on social media, and he recently took a break from posting on Twitter for what he described as a vacation, presumably in Russia.

source:https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/18/world/europe/edward-snowden-asylum-russia.html

THE REAL LIFE HUNGER GAMES

idiots doing

17th DEC 2016

A BRUTAL Russian reality show allowing “fighting, murder and rape” will see contestants armed with knives and dumped in the Siberian wilderness to battle bears, wolves and freezing temperatures.

The Hunger Games-style contest will see 30 participants – half of them women – ditched in the wild for a nine-month survival test in temperatures sinking to minus 40C or lower.

Contestants from different countries seeking a £1.3 million prize will be issued with knives but not guns and expected to hunt and fish for food to stay alive.

The shocking rules say: “Everything is allowed. Fighting, alcohol, murder, rape, smoking, anything.”

Russian millionaire Yevgeny Pyatkovsky, 35, is the brains behind the extreme contest – but says the show won’t take responsibility for what happens to the contestants.

He said: “We will refuse any claim of participants even if they were to be killed or raped.

“We will have nothing to do with this. This will be spelt out in a document to be signed by the participant before the start of the show.”

But while the show’s own rules are that absolutely anything goes, Russian criminal laws will still apply if contestants do end up turning savage.

Contestants are told if there is proof of criminality “the police will come and take you away”.

But critics claim the rules will lead to “savage and bestial behaviour” among contestants as they are forced to live like wild animals.

“It’s as if they’re trying to encourage rape or murder. There may be cameras around but they won’t see everything,” said one online commentator.

Called “Game2: Winter”, the participants – who must be over 18 and “mentally sane” – are expected to fork out £132,000 to take part, although some will be selected in an online poll and enter for free.

“There will be no film crew – the whole area will be dotted with cameras and each participant will be carrying a portable camera with seven-hour life rechargeable battery,” said Mr Pyatkovsky.

The survival contest will be screened online 24/7 using footage from 2,000 fixed cameras on a 2,225 acre slice of taiga, with translations into English, French, German, Spanish, Chinese and Arabic.

“Probably all of you have watched the Lost TV series, but surviving in a tropical climate is quite different from trying to stay alive in the Siberian taiga – boreal forest – at minus 40 degrees Celsius,” said the television executive.

He believes the show, which starts in July, will attract “rich and risky” people craving a new and ultimate challenge.

They will be given survival training from Russia’s elite former GRU Spetznaz operatives, but after that they will be on their own – coping with temperatures ranging from 35C in high summer to minus 40C or lower in the depths of the Siberian winter.

While the snow doesn’t melt, the area’s summers are balmy enough for bikini-clad snowboarders to take to the slopes every year.

He warned: “You should also keep in mind that this will be a real forest, with dangerous wildlife and harmful insects

“Of course, there will be some safety precautions in place, but it would still take about half an hour to reach the area where the show will take place by helicopter.”

“Those taking part will be urged to forage and store food before winter in order to survive the cold months,” reported The Siberian Times.

“In winter, contestants will need to catch fish through ice holes to feed themselves.”

So far the filmmakers have had interest from “professional rescuers, people without special training, professional travellers, entrepreneurs, photographers, jewellers and psychologists”.

Producer Nikolay Ginzburg said: “It sounds strange, but on this project it will be easier to survive not for a professional rescuer but for a simple person.

“It will be necessary to act intuitively, rather than following instructions.”

Each participant will have a panic button linked to a satellite. If they use it, they will be evacuated from the Siberian taiga, but not allowed to return.

All who survive nine months will share the prize.

“The show will absolutely extreme,” said Mr Pyatkovsky.

“There will be no doctors with the participants. If someone gets sick, wounded and realise that he/she can not pass the test, the helicopter will take him/her away to the doctors. Then the participant will quit the game forever.”

Contestants could take on board a few tips from our guide to surviving in the wild based on what we learnt from The Revenant, which sees Leonardo DiCaprio’s character mauled by a bear and left for dead.

Tips include not being a fussy eater, learning basic medical skills and how to improvise with what nature has given you.

The IT millionaire claims that as well as being screened on a dedicated web TV channel, there is interest from mainstream broadcasters in at least five countries to screen the survival show.

Mr Pyatkovsky previously hit the headlines for creating a controversial app which blocks calls from debt collectors.

 

 

source:https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2404086/russian-reality-tv-show/

The Communist Party of China plans to launch a bizarre ‘social credit’ system for its citizens

big brother facebook

25th Oct 2016

PICTURE a world where every single action you make is monitored by the federal government.

Accidentally running a stop sign on a deserted street at 3am? That’s on your record.

Subtly scanning those slightly-fancier $6.99/kilo apples as the ordinary $4.99/kilo ones? That’s on the record too, thief.

Posted a harmless narcissistic selfie to your social feed? The government is ogling you as we speak.

All your social media activity, job movement, leisure activities and online purchases are ranked and perpetually monitored.

Oh — and did we mention this whole thing is both public and mandatory?

It sounds like a creepy George Orwell knock-off, but China’s government is actually developing a “social credit system” in which it monitors each individual citizen and collates information about their day-to-day lives.

The Communist Party of China hopes the ambitious plan will create a culture of “sincerity”, where citizens will be kept in line.

The whole thing is designed to assess each individual person’s trustworthiness in the eyes of the government, and your actions have the power to dramatically alter the rest of your life.

Each person is given a numerical “score” that could determine whether they qualify for financial loans down to getting a nicer room in a hotel or a better table at a restaurant.

It can even affect how many dates you pull, because the information is publicly available, and your social circle can influence your number.

In other words, if you want to live the high life, you and everyone you associate with had better comply.

The Chinese government is hoping that every one of its 1.3 billion citizens will soon be enrolled in a national database that includes all these little details.

The idea has been in development since 2003, but China hopes it will be fully achieved by 2020. It could spark a dramatic shift in how citizens interact with each other and the outside world.

For example, posting pro-government statuses to social media, recycling and showing evidence of fiscal responsibility in your purchases will increase your score.

Wasteful spending, posting political opinions without permission and posting information the Chinese government deems controversial — such as about the Tiananmen Square massacre or Tibet — will decrease your score.

Last month, the Chinese government released a revised plan detailing how the elaborate system would work.

big-brother-1984

A translation recently published by Oxford University China researcher Rogier Creemers points out that a person’s “score” would be publicly available and integral to their place in society.

It states: “Eliminate credit information obstacles between all localities, all departments as well as state organs and people’s organisations, social organisations, enterprises and undertaking work units, and move forward credit information interconnection, exchange and sharing according to the law.”

It also warns that any person or company who is deemed “untrustworthy” could see sanctions imposed on them: “All localities and all departments must carry out their proper functions, mutually co-ordinate, shape joint forces, and build credit supervision, warning and punishment systems where if trust is broken in one place, restrictions are imposed everywhere.”

What your friends say and do can also influence your public score — a feature that will create social pressure among citizens.

It stresses the importance of this being a communal system, saying “all levels’ governments must play a leading role” in helping to “stimulate the common participation and joint governance of the entire society, and realise the effective convergence of government leadership and joint social action.”

The country’s state news agency Xinhua reported on the social credit system two years ago, saying it would focus on four key areas: administrative affairs, commercial activities, social behaviour, and the judicial system.

The system would be accompanied by a related reward and punishment mechanism, with individual identity card numbers or organisation numbers to allow for the sharing of information.

While China’s government has sought to keep tabs on its citizens for decades, this would be the first of its kind of include technologies such as big data, cloud computing and the mobile internet.

The scoring system is public, and your friends’ rankings can affect your own. This creates social pressure to conform.Source:Bloomberg

Last year, China’s central bank gave eight private firms permission to provide personal credit reference services.

Alibaba’s Sesame Credit Management was permitted to score people based on their hobbies, interaction with friends, spending and lifestyle.

China Daily reported the rating method consisted of a numerical score scale between 350 and 950 points, with a higher score making it easier to borrow money.

For example, people with 600 points or more were permitted to take out a loan of less than 5,000 yuan ($A972) when shopping on Alibaba’s online marketplace.

Those with more than 666 points could take out a cash loan of up to 50,000 yuan ($A9719).

Creemers told Fast Company this is nothing new.

“They’ve been working on the credit system for the financial industry for a while now,” he said. “But, in recent years, the idea started growing that if you’re going to assess people’s financial status, you should equally be able to do that with other modes of trustworthiness.”

He points out that — while it comes with certain efficiencies — it’s ultimately just another means by which the government can directly control its people.

“On the one hand, this credit system is the institution of commonsensical rules for market behaviour. On the other hand, it’s a control tool.

“The Party sets out a way of behaving, then it makes that way of behaviour rational. You take away the ability for people to decide on what they think is good and you take away their choice of living a different lifestyle.”

In other words, the system could improve how workers and citizens function in their day-to-day lives.

But this comes at the expense of personal freedom. Is that really worth it?

 

 

source:http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/wtf/the-communist-party-of-china-plans-to-launch-a-bizarre-social-credit-system-for-its-citizens/

Bill Gates’ Philanthropy: 30,000 Indian girls used as guinea pigs to test cancer vaccine

gardasil poison

21st Sept 2016

What philanthropy has to do with vaccines, we would wonder, especially if the philanthropist is Bill Gates. The world’s richest man decided to give away the massive wealth he had amassed by selling computers. It was a philanthropy that the world had not witnessed earlier. Mr. Gates, with his wife Bellinda, built up the foundation that would dispense wealth to the poor: Africa, India and a host of other countries in need of ‘healthcare.’

Why was Bill Gates funding India’s poor health sector? A partial but negative answer began to emerge in 2014, when the country’s Supreme Court raised questions about the operations of the foundation in some rural parts of India.

In 2009, tribal children from the Khammam district in Andhra Pradesh were administered with a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine meant for cervical cancer. Around 16,000 girls between the age of 9-15 years were given three shots of vaccine, (manufactured by Merck) by the state health department. The girls were told that they were being given “well-being” shots. The incident started getting attention when some months later, several girls’ health deteriorated and the following year, five of them died. Two such similar cases of deaths were reported from Vadodara, Gujarat, where 14,000 tribal children were also vaccinated with the HPV vaccine Cervarix, made by Glaxo SmithKline.

Around the same time when these incidents were reported, young girls were hospitalised in northern Colombia with similar symptoms. Coincidentally, these girls had been given doses of vaccine too.

Skeletons started tumbling out when an NGO visited Andhra Pradesh. Health activists from the NGO Sama visited Khammam in March 2010 and found out that more than 100 girls were having epileptic seizures, stomach aches, headaches and mood swings. The girls also complained about early menstruation, heavy bleeding and menstrual cramps. Sama raised the issue that these students were made guinea pigs on the pretext of providing healthcare. The illiterate parents were kept in the dark about the real vaccine, and most of them gave their consent in the form of thumb prints.

The American NGO, Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH) had carried out the studies. They were testing how the cervical cancer vaccine would react on young females. And this unethical test of Path was being funded by none other than the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Ironically, the study was considered a success by the foundation. The Bill Gates Foundation also aided PATH in the study of Rotavirus vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine in Africa and Asia.

A few days after the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared in 2009 that two HPV types cause 70% of cervical cancers, PATH started its five-year project across various parts of the world: Peru, Vietnam, Uganda, and India.

The lives of the poor have no value, especially if they are from the third world countries. The dark decisions of human testing are carried on without much fuss, and authorities prefer to look the other way when there are billions of dollars involved.

 

source: http://wearechange.org/bill-gatesphilanthropy-30000-indian-girls-used-guinea-pigs-test-cancer-vaccine/

Russian public doesn’t trust monitors to make elections fair

hunger games china
17th Sept 2016
Less than half of all Russians think that the presence of monitors can make elections more honest and transparent, with a third of respondents holding that external monitoring has no effect at all.

According to the latest research made by the All-Russian Public Opinion Center (VTSIOM) only 43 percent of Russians think that the presence of observers at elections make them fairer, down from 49 percent in 2011. Thirty-four percent of those polled said that monitors’ participation in elections process had no effect whatsoever on its fairness, also down from 36 percent five years ago.

The share of those who said that in their opinion monitors were actually making elections less fair increased from 5 percent in 2011 to 8 percent. Some 15 percent of respondents said they could not give a direct answer to the question, also up from 10 percent five years back.

When researchers asked Russians what, in their opinion, the main motivation was of those who work as elections monitors, 30 percent said it was just a way to earn money, but 19 percent said they were driven by their pursuit of justice and fairness. Six percent answered that this was a way to exercise ‘an active civil position’, 3 percent hold that people who perform these functions are forced to do so, while a further 3 percent referred to unidentified “own interests.” One percent of poll participants said that observers were just killing their spare time, another 1 percent named various “other reasons”. A sizable 41 percent answered that they had no idea why people were working as elections monitors.

Of those polled, 6 percent said that they had previously worked as elections monitors and 94 percent have never performed such a function. At the same time, 18 percent said they were ready to become monitors in some polls in the future, 8 percent also agreed to participate, but only on condition that their work was supported by the state and the community. Some 70 percent answered that they would turn down such proposal.

Russia is holding parliamentary elections on Sunday, as well as a set of regional polls in which citizens would elect several regional and municipal heads and legislatures.

The head of Russia’s Central Elections Commission (CEC), Ella Pamfilova, has previously urged all political parties to send their representatives to monitor the polls in order to prevent any violations. In the same statement she warned civil servants about criminal responsibility for meddling with the voting process.

In July, representatives of the CEC told reporters that they had signed bilateral agreements with 27 nations, allowing their representatives to conduct monitoring at the forthcoming polls. They also said that albeit the United States was not among these countries, but invitations could be extended to US citizens on a personal basis.

Separate invitations have been extended to representatives of several major international blocs, such as the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and the OSCE’s Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR).

At the same time, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) has been denied access to the State Duma elections because of the ongoing infringement of the rights of the Russian delegation in this group.

 

source: https://www.rt.com/politics/359191-public-in-russia-does-not/

Battle of the elites: Chinese secret society issues deck of cards for the heads Western globalists

obamajoker

18th July 2016

During the Iraq war in 2003, the U.S. issued a deck of cards with the faces and values of high level targets.  Saddam Hussein of course was the Ace of Spades. and members of his cabinet, military, and intelligence services made up the other 51 cards.

And from this motif of using playing cards to designate the value of individuals, allegedly a new deck has come to light and it contains the faces and values of Western globalists who are striving to enslave the earth in a new world order.  But unlike many of the former Iraqis who were in some cases given a cash reward value paid in U.S. dollars, the deck being distributed by the Chinese White Dragon society is offering tons of gold to anyone who annihilates elites pictured on their cards.

In an effort to bring about world peace and justice, the White Dragon Society is presenting a gold bounty for the capture of the persons listed below. The gold can be obtained in Hong Kong or other parts of Asia upon the capture of these felons. These criminals collectively are already actively trying to kill 90% of the world’s population and enslave the survivors. Sufficient evidence of their crimes has already been given to various law enforcement and other agencies around the world. Since the persons below are highly dangerous you are permitted to utilize any necessary force if they resist arrest. Their names are shown in the same format as the deck of cards they released for Iraqi leaders subsequent their illegal invasion of that country.

Ace of Spades
George Bush Senior
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

Ace of Diamonds
David Rockefeller
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

Ace of Hearts
Etienne D’Avignon
Wanted for illegally engineering the destruction of United States
Bounty: One ton of gold

Ace of Clubs
David de Rothschild
Wanted for fraud
Bounty: One ton of gold

King of Spades
George Bush Junior
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

King of Diamonds
Donald Rumsfeld
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

King of Hearts
Bill Clinton
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

King of Clubs
Benyamin Netanyahu
Wanted for mass murder and money laundering
Bounty: One ton of gold

Queen of Spades
Barbara Bush
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

Queen of Diamonds
Janet Yellen
Wanted for fraud
Bounty: One ton of gold

Queen Hearts
Hillary Clinton
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

Queen of Clubs
Victoria Nuland
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold

Joker of Spades
Nicholas Sarkozi
Wanted for mass murder, fraud and drug smuggling
Bounty: One ton of gold

Joker of Diamonds
Mario Draghi
Wanted for embezzlement and fraud
Bounty: One ton of gold

Joker of Hearts
Haruhiko Kuroda
Wanted for theft of Japanese savings
Bounty: One ton of gold

Joker of Clubs
Barack Obama
Wanted for mass murder and embezzlement
Bounty: One ton of gold – Fusionlacedillusions

Known as the Deck of Khazarian Mafia, these supposed new cards are dedicated towards the families and individuals who have facilitated the Bauer/Rothschild dream of economic and political globalism going back to the 17th century.

While most people in the world are programmed to discount elitist organizations like the CFR, Bilderberg, White Dragon Society, etc…, the truth of the matter is that not every elitist cabal is in lock-step with each other, and this can be seen by Russia and China’s newfound coalitions following the 2008 global financial collapse, and their moves publicly to end the dollar, restrict U.S. and Nato power, and bring about their own form of a new world order based on nationalism, free trade, and using economics over firearms to resolve foreign disputes.

 

source: http://tothedeathmedia.com/battle-of-the-elites-chinese-secret-society-issues-deck-of-cards-for-the-heads-western-globalists/

Fingerprints to be tested as ‘currency’

fingerprint currency

10th April 2016

The Yomiuri ShimbunStarting this summer, the government will test a system in which foreign tourists will be able to verify their identities and buy things at stores using only their fingerprints.

The government hopes to increase the number of foreign tourists by using the system to prevent crime and relieve users from the necessity of carrying cash or credit cards. It aims to realize the system by the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The experiment will have inbound tourists register their fingerprints and other data, such as credit card information, at airports and elsewhere.

Tourists would then be able to conduct tax exemption procedures and make purchases after verifying their identities by placing two fingers on special devices installed at stores.

The Inns and Hotels Law requires foreign tourists to show their passports when they check into ryokan inns or hotels.

The government plans to substitute fingerprint authentication for that requirement.

A total of 300 souvenir shops, restaurants, hotels and other establishments will participate in the experiment. They are located in areas that are popular among foreign tourists such as Hakone, Kamakura, Yugawara in Kanagawa Prefecture, and Atami in Shizuoka Prefecture.

The government plans to gradually expand the experiment by next spring, to cover areas including tourist sites in the Tohoku region and urban districts in Nagoya.

It hopes to realize the system throughout the country, including Tokyo, by 2020.

Introducing the system is part of the government’s efforts to increase the annual number of foreign tourists to 40 million by 2020.

It is also aiming to demonstrate the country’s advanced technology by having tourists use the system when they visit Japan for the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics.

Data concerning how and where foreign tourists use the system will be managed by a consultative body led by the government, after the data is converted to anonymous big data.

After analyzing tourists’ movements and their spending habits, the data is expected to be utilized to devise policies on tourism and management strategies for the tourism industry.

However, there are concerns that tourists will be uneasy about providing personal information such as fingerprints.

The experiment will examine issues including how to protect one’s privacy and information management.

Attempts to put similar systems into practical use are under way at a bank and a theme park in Japan.

In October last year, the Huis Ten Bosch theme park in Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture, introduced on a trial basis a similar system in which visitors can make payments with just their fingerprints at about 30 stores and restaurants.

An official from the theme park said, “The system has been well received by customers, including those with children, since it saves them the trouble of taking their wallets out.”

By the end of this month at the earliest, Tokyo-based Aeon Bank will become the first bank in Japan to test a system in which customers will be able to withdraw cash from automatic teller machines using only fingerprints for identification and omitting the use of cash cards.

“The system is also superior in the area of security, such as preventing people from impersonating our customers,” an official from the bank said.Speech

 

 

source: http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002859676