Big Brother


Smartphone Apps to Track ‘Loyalty’ to Communism (China)

8th Oct 2017

The Communist Party of China (CPC) is boasting of over 100 smartphone applications designed to allow senior party members to more accurately track their underlings’ loyalty, based in part on how much communist propaganda the individual consumes on the app.

The Chinese state newspaper Global Times notes that these apps “place additional pressure on members to properly and timely show their loyalty and enthusiasm for the Party.” Party members can be reprimanded if their superior notices they have not been interacting with other party members, reading speeches by president Xi Jinping, or taking online communism classes often enough through the app. The article notes that those who excel and indoctrinate themselves with the apps may be eligible for prizes such as pens and notebooks.

The apps offer a variety of indoctrination media aside from Xi’s speeches, according to the Global Times—among these quizzes to hone knowledge of Maoist thought and broader classes on communist philosophy with required homework.

“The apps not only provide online classes to learn Party doctrines, but also enable users to pay their CPC membership fees or socialize with each other,” the Times adds. “More importantly, the apps will help the CPC evaluate the performance of their nearly 90 million members in a visible, traceable and interactive manner.”

The article provides a number of reasons for there being so many apps, including the use of separate apps for different regional Communist Party structures, different features—like paying Communist Party dues—and different developers. They are all being organized under an umbrella project called “China’s Good Party Member.”

The Chinese government has taken significant technological liberties in the quest to promote communism. Last year, Beijing banned anonymous use of the internet, as well as the publication of any statements that offend “national honor” or suggest an overthrow of the “socialist system.” That law built upon a ban on the publication of blogs or internet comments anonymously passed in 2015.

The CPC regulation apps are part of a greater party organization overhaul in anticipation of the CPC National Congress, beginning October 18. The event, which typically occurs every five years, will give the party an opportunity to elect, re-elect, and promote leaders within the CPC. Local officials told the Global Times in a separate article that they have already been using technology to communicate regarding recommendations for appointments and recruitment of candidates.

“We solicited the opinions of 130 Party members outside the area via telephone and WeChat, an instant messaging service. We visited the homes of elderly members, taking recommendation forms and explaining the policy face to face,” local official Yan Weiping said. Without meeting personally with officials, getting on a CPC ballot is nearly impossible.

In July, communist officials told the Global Times they had organized historical indoctrination tours to generate enthusiasm for the Party Congress. That month, “more than 760 Party members from the State-owned China Construction First Building Corporation Limited took a tour to trace the Party’s footprints from its birth to today.” The tour reportedly took 50 days and included “Chairman Mao’s hometown of Shaoshan, Hunan Province and even Moscow.”

The Chinese state outlet Xinhua states in a report published Friday that the CPC Congress will seek to promote China as “champion of the open world economy” against “protectionism and isolation,” as well as promote a climate change agenda and combat a “Cold War mentality.” Delegates are also expected to vote on amendments to the CPC constitution which would “promote the development of socialism with Chinese characteristics and Party building,” according to Xinhua.

 

source/read more;http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2017/10/06/china-unveils-100-smartphone-apps-track-loyalty-communism/

Lawyers condemn ‘draconian’ move to hold 10-year-old terror suspects without charge

7th Oct 2017

Lawyers have sounded the alarm bells over an agreement allowing children as young as 10 to be held without charge for up to two weeks on suspicion of terrorism offences.

The Turnbull government and the states and territories agreed to the new pre-charge detention regime at a meeting in Canberra this week at which Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews derided civil liberties concerns as a “luxury”.

But Fiona McLeod, president of the Law Council of Australia, said such concerns should not be so lightly dismissed, and condemned the decision to lock up children without charge as “draconian”.

“It’s the combined shock of having a combination of a pre-charge detention of up to 14 days and the revelation they’re going to seek to have this extended to the age of 10,” Ms McLeod told Fairfax Media.

“We’re talking about draconian steps there and we believe that’s crossed the line of intruding on civil liberties too much.”

The federal Labor opposition also hit out at the agreement. “It’s a shocking and drastic step to propose, without charge, the detention of
a child of 10 years old,” shadow attorney-general Mark Dreyfus said.

Justice Minister Michael Keenan on Saturday made the case for extending the regime to include 10-year-olds, arguing it was regrettable but necessary because Islamic State deliberately recruited children.

 

 

source/read more :http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/lawyers-condemn-draconian-move-to-hold-10yearold-terror-suspects-without-charge-20171007-gywaul

The Future the US Military is Constructing: a Giant, Armed Nervous System

28th Sept 2017

Service chiefs are converging on a single strategy for military dominance: connect everything to everything.

Leaders of the Air Force, Navy, Army and Marines are converging on a vision of the future military: connecting every asset on the global battlefield.

That means everything from F-35 jets overhead to the destroyers on the sea to the armor of the tanks crawling over the land to the multiplying devices in every troops’ pockets. Every weapon, vehicle, and device connected, sharing data, constantly aware of the presence and state of every other node in a truly global network. The effect: an unimaginably large cephapoloidal nervous system armed with the world’s most sophisticated weaponry.

In recent months, the Joint Chiefs of Staff put together the newest version of their National Military Strategy. Unlike previous ones, it is classified. But executing a strategy requiring buy-in and collaboration across the services. In recent months, at least two of the service chiefs talked openly about the strikingly similar direction that they are taking their forces. Standing before a sea of dark- blue uniforms at a September Air Force Association event in Maryland, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein said he had “refined” his plans for the Air Force after discussions with the Joint Chiefs “as part of the creation of the classified military strategy.”

The future for the Air Force? The service needed to be more like a certain electric-car manufacturer.

“Every Tesla car is connected to every other Tesla car,” said Goldfein, referring to a presentation by Elon Musk about the ways his firm’s vehicles learn from their collective experience. “If a Tesla is headed down the road and hits a pothole, every Tesla that’s behind it that’s self-driving, it will avoid the pothole, immediately. If you’re driving the car, it automatically adjusts your shocks in case you hit it, too.”
What would the world look like… If we looked at the world through a lens of a network as opposed to individual platforms?
Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein

Goldfein waxed enthusiastically about how Tesla was able to remotely increase the battery capacity of cars in the U.S. Southeast to facilitate evacuation before the recent hurricanes.

“What would the world look like if we connected what we have in that way? If we looked at the world through a lens of a network as opposed to individual platforms, electronic jamming shared immediately, avoided automatically? Every three minutes, a mobility aircraft takes off somewhere on the planet. Platforms are nodes in a network,” the Air Force chief said.

The idea borrows from the  “network centric warfare” concept that seized the military imagination more than a decade ago. But what leaders are today describing is larger by orders of magnitude. It’s less a strategy for integrating multiple networks into operations more efficiently than a plan to stitch everything, networks within networks, into a single web. The purpose: better coordinated, faster, and more lethal operations in air, land, sea, space, and cyberspace.

So the Air Force is making broad investments in data sharing. Maj. Gen. Kimberly A. Crider, the service’s first data officer, is setting up a series of experimental tests in the Nevada desert at Nellis Air Force Base near Las Vegas, seeking to better understand “what happens when we actually connect into this resilient and agile network” said Goldfein. The Air Force’s current experimentation with next-generation light tactical attack aircraft are as much about hardware as networks, he said. “Not only what can I buy and what can they do, but more importantly, can they connect? Can they actually share? And can we tie it to a new network that’s based on sharable information that gets me beyond the challenges I have right now in terms of security?”
The Air Force is also fielding new connected devices. The handheld “Android Tactical Assault kit” or ATAK, designed with special operations forces, provides a common operational picture of everything going on — basically, doing what a huge command-and-control station used to do a few years ago. “What we determined was that there were so many devices on the battlefield that had information that we weren’t collecting. Rather than build a system to pull that in, we actually went to a commercial entity and they created an algorithm. It’s user-defined and it pulls in whatever data you need and puts it on Google Maps,” said Goldfein.

The Air Force used the device during this year’s hurricane relief efforts, sending rescue teams to people reaching out for help on social media, Goldfein said.

The Air Force Science Board is also launching a study into how to control a constellation of objects, some in the air, some in the sea, some on land, some piloted by humans and others more autonomous. James Chow, the board’s new head, said the study would also consider how to connect to other services.

Importantly, although the study would come out of the Air Force, it wouldn’t stop at just Air Force equipment but would extend to other weapons and vehicles in the battlespace, like Navy destroyers, said Chow.

“Our scope would be in helping the Air Force to think about operations they would be conducting that would incorporate joint sensors and platforms, like destroyers, I think that has to be part of it. And that is within the charter of the study,” Chow  said, adding that the study has “the highest priority level for Air Force leadership.”

 

 

 

source/READ more:http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2017/09/future-us-military-constructing-giant-armed-nervous-system/141303/

Public servants face tough new social media rules

7th Aug 2017

PUBLIC servants who “like” or share a Facebook post critical of the government could find themselves in hot water — even if they select the “angry face” reaction.

Government employees could also be in breach of the public service code of conduct for material they send in a private email, or for failing to remove “nasty comments” posted by other people to their social media pages.

The new social media guidelines, published on Monday by the Australian Public Service Commission, reinforce that while APS employees “have the right to participate in public and political debate”, it is “not an unlimited right”.

“If you ‘like’ something on a social media platform, it will generally be taken to be an endorsement of that material as though you’d created that material yourself,” the guidelines read.

“‘Sharing’ a post has much the same effect. However, if you’re sharing something because you disagree with it and want to draw it someone else’s attention, make sure that you make that clear at the time in a way that doesn’t breach the Code itself. It may not be enough to select the ‘angry face’ icon, especially if you’re one of thousands that have done so.”

In the case of a private email to a friend, the guidelines state that there is “nothing to stop your friend taking a screenshot of that email, including your personal details, and sending it to other people or posting it all over the internet”.

“Again, the breach of the Code is not in their subsequent publication of your material, but in your emailing that material in the first place,” it says. “In fact, there’s nothing to stop your friend from forwarding your email directly to your employer and reporting your behaviour.”

And for “nasty comments made by someone else on my social media pages”, the guidelines state that “doing nothing about objectionable material that someone else has posted on your page can reasonably be seen in some circumstances as your endorsement of that material”.

“If someone does post material of this kind, it may be sensible to delete it or make it plain that you don’t agree with it or support it,” it says. “Any breach of the Code would not come from the person making the post. It would come from how you reacted to it.”

Posting anti-government content anonymously or outside of work hours is also a no-no. “Posting material anonymously or using a pseudonym doesn’t guarantee your identity will stay hidden,” it says.

“Even if you don’t identify yourself you can still be identified by someone else. It’s a simple fact: agencies often receive dob-ins about comments made by their employees. Often those employees are shocked to find they’ve been linked back to their employer so easily.”

An employee’s “capacity to affect the reputation” of their agency and the APS “does not stop when you leave the office”. “APS employees are required by law to uphold the APS Values at all times,” the guidelines say.

Even joining the wrong Facebook group could get public servants in hot water, they add. “People will draw conclusions about you and your ability to work impartially from a range of factors. This can include the nature of any online communities that you join.

“For example, if you work as a Customer Service Officer in Centrelink while being a member of a Facebook group that is opposed to current laws about the payment of welfare benefits to migrants. This might raise a concern about whether you would deal with all of your clients fairly and professionally in your APS role.

“People would reasonably be concerned about your ability to implement Government policies in a way that is free from bias and in accordance with the law.”

Nadine Flood, national secretary of the Community and Public Sector Union, described the new policy as “overreach”, saying it “clearly does not strike the right balance between giving our community faith in the Commonwealth public service and allowing people who work in public services to undertake normal, everyday activity in a democracy”.

“The notion that the mum of a gay son who happens to work in Centrelink can’t like a Facebook post on marriage equality without endangering her job is patently absurd,” Ms Flood said in a statement.

“It is one thing to say that public servants working on a particular Government policy shouldn’t be publicly criticising that policy, quite another to say they have no right to engage on social media on anything that could be a community issue.”

Ms Flood said government “acts in every area of life”, so the situation could not be compared to the private sector. “It’s completely unreasonable for a worker to face disciplinary action over a private email or something as benign as ‘liking’ a social media post,” she said. “Of course there need to be limits but [this] policy goes too far.”

 

 

source;http://www.news.com.au/finance/work/at-work/public-servants-face-tough-new-social-media-rules/news-story/db2893503fa0cb7997f9e066936c322c

Cash crackdown boss floats nano-chips in notes

4th July 2017

THE man charged with cracking down on the “black economy” has revealed how he would like to keep track of your $100 and $50 notes.

Hi-tech nano-chips would be implanted in Australia’s “disappearing” cash under a plan floated by Michael Andrew, the head of the federal government’s Black Economy Taskforce.

Speaking to The Courier-Mail, Mr Andrew said too much cash was being hoarded under pensioners’ beds and stockpiled as a trusted currency in China.

Estimates for the size of Australia’s so-called black economy vary from $23 billion to $50 billion. The government claims tax avoidance through cash payments costs the budget up to $10 billion in revenue, money that could go towards funding welfare and other services.

In the May budget, the federal government announced an extra $32 million funding for the Australian Taxation Office to fund its cash crackdown, which it expects to bring in an extra $589 million in revenue over the next four years.

According to Mr Andrew, who will hand down his final report in October, there should be 14 $100 notes for every adult in Australia but there are fewer than that in circulation. While criminals prefer the $50 note, as the Reserve Bank pointed out in its defence of cash last year, foreign migrants and pensioners prefer $100s.

“You see a lot of Chinese don’t trust their banking system so they like to take Australian dollars back to China,” he told The Courier-Mail. “We’re seeing $100 notes used by pensioners because there’s an assets-based test at the moment and they like to keep a fair bit of cash under the bed.

“I’m working with the Reserve Bank and Austrac to get a better understanding of where our notes are. Clearly there’s a section of this that is organised crime. One of the options we would have is putting an expiry date on these notes.

“You could put a trace on some of these notes to see where they would go. You can use nano technology to put little chips in so you could then trace it.”

Last year, a report by UBS recommended Australia scrap the $100 note. According to UBS, benefits may include “reduced crime (difficult to monetise), increased tax revenue (fewer cash transactions) and reduced welfare fraud (claiming welfare while earning or hoarding cash)”.

Liberal Democrats Senator David Leyonhjelm at the time criticised the cash crackdown proposal, saying “the only people who are distressed by the cash economy are the government and the public servants who want to spend taxes”.

“The incentives for a cash economy would be a lot reduced if taxes were a lot lower,” he said in December. “It’s a reaction to the level of taxes we pay.”

Earlier this year, Revenue and Financial Services Minister Kelly O’Dwyer defended the move, saying “we don’t believe in a self-help approach to tax reform”.

“We think it should apply and be fairly represented across everybody,” she said. “There are always going to be people who try and avoid their tax, and [for] those in the cash economy it’s much easier to avoid detection.

“This comes at a time where we’re experiencing rapid technological change. A lot of people under 40 don’t really carry that much cash around anymore, but even despite this we have seen an increase in the number of $100 notes in distribution.

“I don’t know too many people who walk around with $100 notes, I certainly haven’t sighted one in a long time, but the point is that there is clearly an issue that we need to grapple with.”

 

source; http://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/cash-crackdown-boss-floats-nanochips-in-notes/news-story/05db2212948c7d02e822532de63c170d

WikiLeaks Releases CIA Vault 7 ‘ELSA’ Geolocation Tracking Project

29th June 2017

WikiLeaks published the next release in their CIA Vault 7 series today, revealing details on a geolocation tracking project named ELSA.

WikiLeaks describes the ELSA project as, “a geo-location malware for WiFi-enabled devices like laptops running the Microsoft Windows operating system.” The exploit is installed on a target system using other CIA bugs that WikiLeaks has previously detailed; once installed ELSA scans all visible WiFi access points in the area and records the ESS identifier, MAC address and signal strength of the access points at regular intervals. The targeted device does not need to be connected to the WiFi access point to record this information; the device simply needs to be WiFi enabled.

The ELSA malware automatically attempts to use public geo-location databases from tech companies such as Google or Microsoft to resolve the position of the device and records the longitude and latitude data along with the timestamp. This information is then stored on the device in an encrypted format to be later be transferred to another device. This encrypted information is not transferred wirelessly. Instead, a CIA operator must gain access to the device using other CIA exploits in order to transfer and gain access to the encrypted information.

The WikiLeaks page further states, “The ELSA project allows the customization of the implant to match the target environment and operational objectives like sampling interval, maximum size of the logfile and invocation/persistence method. Additional back-end software (again using public geo-location databases from Google and Microsoft) converts unprocessed access point information from exfiltrated logfiles to geo-location data to create a tracking profile of the target device.”
The full WikiLeaks description and documentation relating to Project ELSA can be found here.

 

 

 

 

source:http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2017/06/28/wikileaks-releases-cia-vault-7-elsa-geolocation-tracking-project/

Sydney man has Opal card implanted into hand to make catching public transport easier

28th June 2017

If you have ever been caught fumbling for your Opal card at the ticket gate, a Sydney man may have found the solution.

He had the chip from an Opal card inserted into his hand and is now tapping on using the technology that is implanted underneath his skin.

Bio-hacker Meow-Ludo Disco Gamma Meow-Meow, his legal name, had the Opal near-field communication (NFC) chip cut down and encased in bio-compatible plastic, measuring 10 millimetres by 6 millimetres.

He then had the device implanted just beneath the skin on the side of his left hand.

“It gives me an ability that not everyone else has, so if someone stole my wallet I could still get home,” he said.

He is able to use the Opal just like other users, including topping the card up on his smartphone.

However, his hand needs to be about 1 centimetre from the reader, closer than traditional cards, and he sometimes needs to tap more than once, due to his device’s smaller antenna.

“My goal is to have frictionless interaction with technology,” he said.
‘Don’t try this at home’

Mr Meow-Meow had his device implanted by a piercing expert, in a procedure lasting approximately one hour.

He warned others not to do the same without expertise and research.

“Most certainly don’t try this at home unless you know what you’re doing,” he said.

Mr Meow-Meow said there was a risk of bacterial infection whenever anything was implanted beneath the skin, so it was important to consult professionals.

“Be aware of the risks involved and make a wise judgement based on that.”

He also said his actions were a breach of Opal’s terms of service, which prohibit tampering.

“It will be really interesting to see what happens when the first transit officer scans my arm,” he said.
‘This is the future’

Mr Meow-Meow does not believe his implant was very radical.

“Putting technology into the body is not unusual,” he said.

Implants like pacemakers for heart conditions and intrauterine devices (IUDs) for birth control are now widely used and the Sydney scientist said his device was a natural extension.

“While one might be for birth control, which we’ve decided is pretty OK, this one is to make catching public transport easier.”

Mr Meow-Meow had his Opal implant custom-made by a US lab, Dangerous Things.
Closeup of a Mickey Mouse bandaid.
Photo: Mr Meow-Meow said it is actually a breach of Opal’s terms of service to have the implant. (ABC News: Nick Dole)

He has two other NFC implants in his hand and arm, including one that he keeps documents on.

He said NFC implants could be widely used in the future, particularly when a person’s identity needs to be proven.

“You’ll see it in parole, in nursing homes where people are unable to divulge medical details,” Mr Meow-Meow said.

“If I could go to a government department and swipe my hand, that would make accessing these services a lot easier.”

 

 

source:http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-27/sydney-bio-hacker-has-opal-travel-card-implanted-into-hand/8656174?

Stolen American malware used to take over traffic cameras in Australia

23rd Jun 2017

There’s fresh reason to be worried about Wannacry, the malicious software that hackers stole from the U.S. National Security Agency.

In May, hackers used the malware to infect computers in more than 70 countries. The attack was particularly bad in England, where the software disrupted service at many of the country’s busiest hospitals.

Now, the software has been used to take control of 55 speed and red light cameras in Victoria, the most densely populated state in Australia. The Czech security company Avast says the hackers didn’t use the Internet to launch the attack. The infection came through a USB drive.

That was likely the same technique the U.S. and Israel used to damage Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility with the Stuxnet virus.

Jonathan Penn, director of strategy at Avast, said in a statement Thursday:

“This attack has shown us that even if your device is not directly connected to the Internet, that doesn’t mean it is completely safe or can’t be infected with ransomware like WannaCry. The traffic cameras were connected to a vulnerable USB drive, which at one point got infected with malware.

“This incident isn’t the first of its kind. Stuxnet did its job on the Iranian nuclear facilities through none other than a USB in 2012.

“These attacks shine a light on not only the dangers of USB drives, but the diverse ways behind the spreading of malware and viruses like WannaCry or Stuxnet and the need for robust protections.”

There’s fresh reason to be worried about Wannacry, the malicious software that hackers stole from the U.S. National Security Agency.

In May, hackers used the malware to infect computers in more than 70 countries. The attack was particularly bad in England, where the software disrupted service at many of the country’s busiest hospitals.

Now, the software has been used to take control of 55 speed and red light cameras in Victoria, the most densely populated state in Australia. The Czech security company Avast says the hackers didn’t use the Internet to launch the attack. The infection came through a USB drive.

That was likely the same technique the U.S. and Israel used to damage Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility with the Stuxnet virus.

Jonathan Penn, director of strategy at Avast, said in a statement Thursday:

“This attack has shown us that even if your device is not directly connected to the Internet, that doesn’t mean it is completely safe or can’t be infected with ransomware like WannaCry. The traffic cameras were connected to a vulnerable USB drive, which at one point got infected with malware.

“This incident isn’t the first of its kind. Stuxnet did its job on the Iranian nuclear facilities through none other than a USB in 2012.

“These attacks shine a light on not only the dangers of USB drives, but the diverse ways behind the spreading of malware and viruses like WannaCry or Stuxnet and the need for robust protections.”

 

 

 

source:http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/cyber-life/sd-me-wannacry-malware-20170622-story.html

How the internet of things could be spying on you

10th June 2017

BIG Brother is watching.

Your front door, television and child’s doll could all be spying on you.

The internet of things, everyday objects connected to the web, can send and receive data and appliances have the power to gain control and track your behaviour and movements.

At least 40 per cent of Australian homes now have at least one internet of things device and they are disguised as normal appliances. They can be fridges, kettles or even window blinds.

There are warnings about the danger of having an internet of things device in your home.

Just last year a Norwegian Consumer Council discovered a children’s doll was recording what children were saying and sending the information to a US company, which could share and use the data in a number of different ways.

The consumer council found internet-connected toys My Friend Cayla and i-Que breached several consumer laws.

DEVICES TRACK YOU

Lecturer at UNSW’s School of Taxation and Business Law, Kayleen Manwaring, told news.com.au people needed to be cautious.

The internet of things has been beneficial to health and aged care and agriculture, but Ms Manwaring said people using it frivolously needed to understand what information items could gather.

“Many of the internet of things devices collect a whole lot of data about you, what you’re doing, your kids, your home and it may not be the sort of data you want to make available,” she said.

Ms Manwaring said people needed to start thinking about things before they bought them.

“Do you really need that internet-connected hairbrush,” she said.

“A lot of devices can track your geo location. The internet of things knows where you are, when you leave home, when you come home.

“Mobile phones track you, the websites you visit.”

Ms Manwaring said there was never a way of knowing where the personal information about you went, and what it was used for. Some companies claim to use the information for marketing, but the fine print is never quite clear enough, according to Ms Manwaring.

“A lot of consumer devices aren’t very secure and there’s not a lot of security protocols,” she said.

“It’s not just the corporates who can get into your daughter’s doll, but malicious hackers getting into these devices.

“There’s not only data security flaws. The internet of things in some circumstances allow malicious hackers to control devices or attack other devices.”

DEVICES CAN BE DANGEROUS

Ms Manwaring said the internet of things could be dangerous because we didn’t know what the devices were trying to achieve and who they were trying to target.

The My Friend Cayla doll also had a security flaw where strangers could talk and listen through the doll, and there were pre-programmed phrases that mentioned specific brands targeting children.

“The problem is we really don’t know what they are doing with that data,” Ms Manwaring said.

“We could be optimistic and say they’re not doing anything suspicious, but unless you tell me exactly what you’re doing with it — it’s well known marketers employ behavioural psychologists and the point is to influence us to buy products. That might be OK, there’s plenty of times we buy products, but it’s a problem when they are targeting vulnerable people like children.”

Ms Manwaring said devices you bought never really belonged to you and would stop functioning without certain embedded software.

“IoT devices have the potential to collect more intimate data about individuals than was possible with previous devices,” Ms Manwaring wrote in an article on The Conversation.

“This data can then be used to create profiles that give incredible insight into consumers, and can even predict behaviour.”

Ms Manwaring said the law may not protect people from the internet of things.

“Many IoT devices put consumer privacy at risk, but the Privacy Act has significant limitations, as the definition of ‘personal information’ is very narrow,” she wrote.

In the future, consumers and regulators could pursue device suppliers for information they are getting under Australia Consumer Law, but Ms Manwaring said that was still a grey area.

“We don’t know what ‘acceptable quality’ is when it comes to some of these devices, for instance. Is an internet-connected kettle that boils water perfectly well, but can be easily hacked, of acceptable quality?” she said.

Ms Manwaring said consumers should think hard about the risks of these seemingly harmless items before purchasing them.

 

source: http://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/inventions/how-the-internet-of-things-could-be-spying-on-you/news-story/6dd5ed7582d4ed79b6a43964336b452f

Facebook wants to spy on people through their smartphone camera and analyse the emotions on their face

8th June 2017

FACEBOOK has been secretly developing creepy technology which spies on people and automatically analyses their facial expressions.

The social network applied for a patent to capture pictures of a user through their smartphone


The creepy designs, which date back to 2015, were discovered by software company CBI Insight, which has been analysing Mark Zuckerberg’s “emotion technology”.

Patent documents contain illustrations showing a person holding a smartphone with a camera taking a picture from which “emotion characteristics” like smiling or frowning are detected.

If the person appears to like what they’re seeing, Facebook could place more of the same type of content in front of them.

The creepy designs, which date back to 2015, were discovered by software company CBI Insight, which has been analysing Mark Zuckerberg’s “emotion technology”.

Patent documents contain illustrations showing a person holding a smartphone with a camera taking a picture from which “emotion characteristics” like smiling or frowning are detected.

If the person appears to like what they’re seeing, Facebook could place more of the same type of content in front of them.

Patents don’t always make it through to the end product- so it’s not clear whether Facebook will bring out this new feature.

Researchers at CBI Insights warned that the plans could put a lot of people off using the service.

“On the one hand, they want to identify which content is most engaging and respond to audience’s reactions, on the other emotion-detection is technically difficult, not to mention a PR and ethical minefield,” it wrote in a blogpost.

But that’s not all.

Facebook appears to have tested out similar technology to work out which emoji to send to people using a selfie.

If you’re smiling, it could automatically send a smiley face and vice versa.

Its most recent emotional patent – which was granted on 25 May this year – aims to tackle a dilemma many of us will have faced.

It can be difficult to make your text messages come across exactly as you mean them to, and sarcasm or jokes are often lost in translation – leading to some awkward conversations.

A new tool lets the social network to give your texts more feeling – so they won’t be misconstrued.

The system picks up data from the keyboard, mouse, touchpad, touchscreen to detect typing speed and how hard the keys are pressed.

Facebook will accordingly change the text font and size, before shaping to make it more emotive and relevant to your mood.

Facebook said that it does not currently offer tools to detect emotion.

If you want to check what Facebook sees and shares about you, check out its privacy policy here.

 

source‘https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/3738170/facebooks-plans-to-watch-you-through-your-smartphone-camera-as-you-scroll-through-social-network-revealed/