Migrants in Europe Linked To Soaring Violence and Crime in Germany, Study Finds

20 March 2018

A Germany university found that a 10.4 percent increase in violent crime was linked to an influx of migrants into the country’s southern region.

The increase in crime took place in 2015 and 2016 at the height of the European migration crisis, when German Chancellor Angela Merkel ignored E.U. rules and allowed an open-door policy for migrants entering the state from war-torn Syria.

More than 90 percent of the 10.4 percent increase in reported violent crimes was attributed to young male migrants in Germany’s southern state of Lower Saxony, according to a new study from the Zurich University of Applied Sciences. A huge wave of migrants flooded into the European Union in 2015 from countries through Greece and Turkey that led to more than one million migrants applying for asylum in Germany.



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German nurses need self-defence courses against increasing migrant violence in hospitals

20th March 2018

There is nothing wrong with being from a different “race.” The problem is when you allow an influx of a vastly different culture and expect them to have the same values your culture has spent hundreds of years building. –  TMN


Hospital personnel in Bielefeld are increasingly being threatened, abused and attacked, the Neue Westfälische reports. Especially younger nurses report of verbal abuse and physical attacks by migrants. The hospital now needs to take special security measures to protect its personnel.

If something isn’t going fast enough nurses are quickly called “sluts, bitches and incompetent” especially by “Southern” migrants, hospital employees tell the newspaper.

The hospital is now considering security steps like emergency buttons and classes in self-defence. One of the nurses reported an incident in which she needed to resuscitate a dying person and had another patient spit in front of her feet because he was tired of waiting.

Many employees have already quit their jobs due to long working hours, stress and how they are treated by patients. Male colleagues tell similar stories. One even spoke of a threat to his life and that he fears nothing will be done until it is too late.



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Forgot your password? No problem, you might soon be able to use your penis?

13th March 2018

THERE are some inventions you know will change the world and I wholeheartedly believe this company’s “proprietary penis recognition tech” is one such example.

Operating with the belief fingerprint scanners and facial recognition technology is passé, webcam platform CamSoda has made it possible to use your penis as your password — about time!

As of today, the dick-ometrtics platform will give men the chance to use their penis for something more practical while positioned in front of the computer.

To use the service, users will need to supply the website with a picture of their old fella, which will be stored in the system to assist the proprietary penis recognition tech.

While the concept is probably not the best to use while commuting on a train during peak hour, CamSoda’s vice president Darren Press said it has its advantages.

“In order to ensure personal data is safeguarded against unwarranted individuals, biometrics have become progressively popular for its ability to provide a layer of security that is impenetrable,” he said, making me laugh at his choice of the word impenetrable.

Mr Press added that dick-ometrics takes biosecurity to the next level.

“Like a fingerprint and an eyeball, which are two of most commonly used body parts in biometric technologies, the penis has many, many differentiating factors like size, colour and vein protrusion,” he said.



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Questions for TSA after reports of laptop and phone searches on domestic flights

13th March 2018


There are a growing number of reports of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) searching the electronic devices of passengers on domestic flights in the US, according to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which has sued the federal agency for records.

The ACLU Foundation of Northern California filed a lawsuit against the TSA on Monday demanding that the government disclose its policies for searching the computers and cellphones of domestic travelers, arguing that anecdotal accounts have raised concerns about potential privacy invasions.

“We’ve received reports of passengers on purely domestic flights having their phones and laptops searched, and the takeaway is that TSA has been taking these items from people without providing any reason why,” the staff attorney Vasudha Talla told the Guardian. “The search of an electronic device has the potential to be highly invasive and cover the most personal details about a person.”

A TSA spokesman, Matt Leas, declined to comment on the lawsuit but said: “TSA does not search the contents of electronic devices.”

Over the past year, civil liberties groups have repeatedly raised concerns about US border agents expanding the invasive searches of international travelers’ phones. Some travelers reported authorities demanding they unlock their devices and allow officials to review text messages, social media accounts, photos and other private information – without warrants or reasonable suspicion. Now, there are questions about whether similar practices could be happening for passengers traveling within the US, raising fears that the government may be increasing surveillance and privacy violations at airports.

“It speaks to a growing attempt by the government to investigate individuals not based on probable cause or reasonable suspicion, but perhaps based on impermissible factors,” said Talla.

The ACLU of Northern California had not previously received reports of these kinds of domestic searches, but recently learned of a handful of cases, said Talla, who said the ACLU did not have specific data to share.

There are no clear patterns in the searches that people have described to the ACLU, though in each case, the TSA has not explained its justification to passengers, who have typically experienced the searches while going through security before boarding flights, Talla said. The ACLU in California has not heard of specific cases of the TSA requiring domestic fliers to unlock their devices, but last year, numerous reports emerged that Customs and Border Protection (CBP) would not let travelers enter the US without granting the agents access to devices.

When devices are unlocked, “they are really able to access a person’s entire life that is on the phone as well as using the device to access what is on the cloud”, Talla said.

One woman who shared her story with the ACLU told the Guardian that in the last year, she had twice had her electronics searched while flying within California. The 64-year-old, who works in the not-for-profit sector and requested anonymity for fear that she could face further scrutiny from TSA, said that on one occasion last year, TSA agents pulled her aside to pat her down multiple times and eventually asked to see both her iPhones – a work and personal one.

The agents did not ask her to unlock the phones, but took them for at least 10 minutes out of her view, she said, adding that she quickly became distraught.

“I no longer had my phones, so there was no one I could contact,” she said, adding, “It just feels like an invasion of privacy, especially when they are not telling you what the problem is.”

The woman said on a recent trip, the TSA also briefly took her laptop, which was password protected.

“If somebody is suspecting you of doing something wrong or some kind of crime, you should be told what it is. You should be able to defend yourself,” she added.



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80 percent of mass shooters showed no interest in video games, researcher says

Another out of touch ignoramus trying to pin blame on make-believe video games. Can someone remind him cavemen were bashing each other’s skulls in with rocks well before anyone had a PlayStation.



11 March 2018

President Trump met with video game industry representatives Thursday, after saying last month violent video games may play a role in mass shootings. The president met with parents like Melissa Henson.

“The kind of messages and images that they are putting in their minds, I think they’re nightly dress rehearsals for huge acts of violence,” she said.

But psychologist Patrick Markey’s research shows 80 percent of mass shooters did not show an interest in violent video games.

“It seems like something that should make us safer so it’s a totally understandable reaction,” Markey said. “The problem is just the science, the data, does not back up that they actually have an effect.”

Other critics point to the appearance of specific weapons in video games, like a Remington assault rifle pictured in popular game “Call of Duty.” Images of the rifle come from a lawsuit by Sandy Hook parents, who are suing Remington, saying the company bears responsibility for the killings of the 26 children at the school by shooter Adam Lanza in 2012.

“He was within this younger male demographic that Remington was trying to sell guns to,” said attorney Josh Koskoff. “What we are seeing here is what I describe as a ‘chickens coming home to roost’ scenario, where you saturate, you sell so recklessly so many of these weapons to this high-risk demographic.”

We reached out to Remington but did not hear back. The Entertainment Software Association, which represents the video game industry, said it told the president that “numerous scientific studies” show there is “no connection between video games and violence.”  In fact, Markey said his work shows when a new violent game is released, crime actually drops.



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Should people with ‘addictions’ be euthanased?

Do you believe in Euthanasia? Is it ok for the elderly? The chronically ill? The people in depressive and emotional pain? Recently cases regarding decisions to die have been in the news as the Netherlands passed a law to allow people who are depressed and seemingly cannot recover to end their lives. What do you think of that?

What do you think when it is extended to someone who has an addiction to a substance? Is it the same? –TMN


10th March 2018

For all those who don’t think that the “slippery slope” argument is valid, just consider this. In Belgium and the Netherlands, the category of “addiction” is now valid grounds for euthanasia. And tragically, this has already started to occur.

As recently as 2016, a man named Mark Langedijk, who suffered from chronic alcoholism, was granted permission to be euthanased. This is how the heart-breaking scene of his death was described by The Independent:

On the day of his death, he “laughed, drank, smoked, ate ham and cheese sandwiches and soup with meatballs” until his doctor arrived at his parents’ home at 3.15pm.

His doctor explained the procedure, before telling Mr Landedijk to get into bed and to stay calm.

At this point, they all “started crying, my parents, everyone actually, even Mark”.

“We cried, told each other that we loved each other, that it would be all right, that we would care for each other, that we would see each other again, we held each other,” he said. “If it was not so terrible, it would have been nice.

“Mark’s eyes turned away, he sighed deeply. His last. Dr Marijke injected the third syringe. His face changed, lost color. My little brother was dead.”

Wayne Hall, Centre of Youth Substance Abuse Research, UQ, and Malcolm Parker, Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, UQ, have written that cases like these are far from being exceptions. They are instead, part of an international trend in relaxing euthanasia laws. As they explain:

The range of medical conditions for which patients can request euthanasia has expanded over time. It now includes not just terminal or degenerative illnesses but any condition that, in the patient’s view, produces unrelieved, intolerable suffering. The grounds for euthanasia in these countries have been taken recently to include intractable depression, chronic forms of addiction, autism and personality disorders and people who do not claim to have any disorder but are simply ‘tired of living’ and want to die.

For their part, Hall and Parker state that their “aims in considering this case are not to argue for or against euthanasia” but to “prompt discussion of this issue within the field of addiction” and “to identify important issues that need to be considered by physicians”.

Against the popular scholarly consensus, Hall and Parker challenge the “disease model” for understanding addiction. They have to do this because, as they themselves acknowledge, “…we recognise that chronic alcohol and other drug use can produce illnesses that may reduce capacity, such as severe depression or cognitive impairment.” What they suggest is their own ‘Twelve-Step Program’, similar to hugely successful Alcoholics Anonymous. Except, rather than helping people to be free of their addictions, it is a checklist to see if it’s valid to put them out of their misery.

Richard E. Ashcroft—School of Law, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK—has published an excellent, and concise, critique to Hall and Parker’s proposal, arguing that we should be extremely slow to “accept addiction as a reason for performing euthanasia”. Ashcroft makes two insightful and important points.

First, Ashcroft argues that, “If we are not willing to do so [to view addictions as a brain disease], we cannot see them readily as objects of treatment and medical care, and thus much of the medical model of care and treatment falls away, along with some of the medical, although not all the social, arguments for harm reduction, heroin (or other drug) prescribing in addiction treatment, and so on.”





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Holocaust survivor Eva Mozes Kor: TSA put me through “demeaning” body search

6th march 2018

Holocaust survivor says she was a victim of a “very demeaning body search” by U.S. Transportation Security Administration agents after a visit in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Eva Mozes Kor tweeted on Sunday in Albuquerque that she had to undergo the intrusive body search before boarding a plane and that it ruined her experience following a lecture.

The Indiana resident spoke with teachers from around New Mexico at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History on Saturday about suffering through inhumane scientific experiments at the Auschwitz concentration camp as a 10-year-old.

It was unclear if the TSA search in question occurred at Albuquerque International Sunport.

TSA Regional Public Affairs Manager Carrie Harmon did not immediately return an email from The Associated Press.

Kor has been telling her own story as a Holocaust survivor for most of her life.

But in a few weeks, a documentary film about her life will add another level of the public’s understanding of the energetic Terre Haute woman who learned to forgive her Nazi tormentors as part of her own self-healing.

“Eva” will premiere on April 5 in Indianapolis and on April 14 in Terre Haute.

It’s a documentary project produced by Ted Green Films, Mika Brown and Indianapolis PBS affiliate WFYI, and it captures the legacy of Kor as she has persisted in telling her story in her own effort to make the world a better place.

Kor lost her parents and siblings to the Holocaust after her Jewish family was removed from their home in Romania and sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp.

She and her twin sister, Miriam, both of whom survived Auschwitz, were experimented upon by Nazi doctor Josef Mengele, and they were orphans upon their liberation from the camp.

As an adult who married and moved to Terre Haute, Kor has shared her Holocaust story and became well-known for her activism and the establishment of the CANDLES Holocaust Museum (CANDLES stands for Children of Auschwitz Nazi Deadly Lab Experiments Survivors)

Now 84, Kor remains active as she travels the world, sharing her personal epiphany that forgiveness is the ultimate healing agent for one’s psychological and emotional wounds.

“I discovered the cure from victimhood,” Kor said as she talked about the upcoming release of the film and how her message of forgiveness has received both praise and criticism. “Should I keep that to myself?”

Kor stands only 4 feet, 9 inches tall, and she uses a walker. But her personality still seems giant as she enters a room.

“I’m level-headed but not afraid to take on a challenge,” Kor said as she explained her quick mind and steadfast determination to help others.

“I am never a worrier. I am a doer,” she said.



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